Keeping the Momentum—Why Music in the Workplace is a Must

Your co-worker in the next cubicle is on a conference call. Another two are cursing the printer as they clear out a paper jam. A project briefing is happening in the area next to you. And you’re stressing trying to finish a project by noon. Time to unplug? Or better yet, plug in? Your headphones may present the escape you desperately need to either regain focus or drown out a too noisy or too quiet work environment.

A recent study conducted by Dr. Teresa Lesiuk, University of Miami, found that music can improve work performance by placing a person in a positive mood as melodious sounds encourage the release of dopamine. Other studies have found that listening to background music can help improve one’s efficiency of performing repetitive tasks.

Walk around Martino Flynn and you often will see employees with headphones in or hear music playing from offices. As a creative agency, I wanted to dive into the reasons behind music and tap into my fellow employees’ playlists.

Meet Martino Flynn’s Digital team.

Frank Piacitelli (Left), Lauren McIlveen  (Center), Matt D’Angelo (Right)

Why do you listen to music at work?

FP: Music helps me focus. Music can help drown out distractions when I need to stay on task. It can add some energy when I need to power through a volume of tasks. Music also helps elevate my mood if it’s raining outside or if it’s been a challenging day.

LM: I listen to music at work because it motivates me—especially fast, upbeat music—and keeps me focused. The office can be noisy and with so many distractions, music helps me “tune into” what I’m doing. On the other hand, sometimes the office is too quiet, so I use it as background noise.

MD: My main reason for listening to music at work is to fill the quiet. I get fixated when mouse clicks and keystrokes are the only aural stimulation. To me, designing without a buzzing work space or some type of soundtrack feels unnatural. I need an energy and rhythm to ‘lean against’. I find it productive to have creativity (music) feeding creativity (design).

What types of music inspire Ideas That Do More?

FP: I like high-energy rock. I also like funk, music with a good groove, and vocal rock with good hooks and harmonies—music influenced by the Beatles and the Beach Boys. I’m a guitar player, so I’m partial to guitar-oriented music.

LM: If I have to pick, I would say country, since that’s pretty much all I listen to!

MD: I use music as a tool. It’s a mood-based decision when selecting tunes that will engage or produce desired outcomes. Sometimes, as a drummer, I’m listening to certain music to be inspired by the mastery of the band. Other times, I choose songs for the storytelling or lyrical characteristics. Many times (more often than I want to admit), I select music for nostalgia, bringing me back to eras, styles, and memories of my past. Usually when designing at the office, my selections may be based on the desire to set a mood or just have a certain visceral feel that helps percolate creativity—that typically means tracks that are modern retro; synth pop that has a West Coast or floaty, lush vibe.

What’s on repeat with your work playlist?

FP:

LM:

MD:

 

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Facebook Eliminates Modified Link Previews: What Brands and Marketers Need to Know

On June 28, Facebook announced a major update to its Graph API version 2.9 – it was eliminating the ability to edit and modify previews for shared link posts. Eliminating link preview customization means that publishers will no longer be able to customize link metadata, specifically, the headline, description, and link image.

The changes to Facebook modified link preview went into effect on July 18. The original announcement eliminating modified link previews included a 90-day depreciation period, meaning that the functionality will be fully removed by September. In addition, it’s expected that link modification will be removed from the ads platform as early as July 26. Facebook has indicated that they are making this change in order to “stop the spread of misinformation and false news” on the platform, according to its business help center.

For certain publishers, such as verified news outlets, Facebook is allowing publishers to ‘claim ownership’ of owned URL and domains, and these pages will still have the ability to modify links. However, at this time, this capability is restricted to news, sports, and entertainment publishers. More information on link ownership on Facebook for publishers can be found here.

What does the elimination of modified link preview mean for brands and other Facebook page owners?

While this is a major change for page owners and publishers, there are two simple steps you can take to prepare your site content to best respond to this change, and help avoid bad link previews on Facebook.

  1. Make sure your website metadata is up-to-date and accurate:

While shared link previews have always utilized a site’s metadata for headline, description, and image, publishers will no longer be able to modify this information. Check that your site’s metadata is accurate, SEO-optimized, and Facebook optimized, especially for pages you frequently share on social. Most frequently, Facebook pulls the link headline from your H1 tag, and the description from your site’s metadescription.

  1. Leverage Facebook’s Open Graph tagging to help control how your site content appears:

Facebook’s Graph API, which determines how link content is displayed on Facebook, works in conjunction with it’s Open Graph tags. Ensuring your website utilizes these tags is the best way to control how your site content appears on Facebook. But don’t worry – this doesn’t’ mean that you have to necessarily make major updates to your website code. The good news is that in addition to Open Graph tags, the Facebook API is also able to read most standard meta tag language. We recommend installing the Facebook Open Graph tags if you would like your shared site links and content on Facebook to display information that is different from your website’s metatags. In addition, the Open Graph tags give you the most control over what image appears with a shared link preview. To see how your site content appears as a shared link, as well as any Open Graph recommendations and error warnings, you can utilize Facebook’s Sharing Debugger.

If your site metadata is not optimized, it’s likely that any shared links to your site will give a poor preview and a bad user experience. Links with a poor preview almost always experience low engagement. Links which utilize a full-width image with appropriate headline and description gain the most exposure on the platform, and garner the most engagement.

Updating and optimizing your site’s metadata means that your links will work with the Facebook Graph API, giving you the most control of how your content appears on the platform. It’s the best way to fix bad link previews, and with the 90 day depreciation period, there is still time to make metadata updates before the changes are fully in effect.

If you have questions about the changes to Facebook’s Modify Link Preview feature or how to optimize and update your site’s metadata, contact Lead Planner Rose Cooper.

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