All posts by Jeff Antonitto

B2B and social media: How to get started in 4 steps

Start small and define your goals. Some experts believe there are about 500 different social media resources out there. You don’t need to be active in all of them; just find out which ones your customers, prospects, and competitors are highly involved in and then narrow it down to the top two tools. Using any more than that puts you at risk for spreading yourself too thin.

Now define your goals, and try to make them quantifiable. For example: What do you want to accomplish? Leads, sales, or something else?

Generate a content calendar. Don’t try to wing it because it can lead to rushed, poorly thought-out posts that no one will want to read. Plan around key dates:

  • What trade shows are you planning to attend?
  • When do you have product releases?
  • When are your prospects’ buying cycles and what stage of the buying cycle are they in?

Then supplement with helpful, informative topics; don’t make the mistake of trying to sell in each post. No one wants to read a sales pitch.

This calendar will help sell the ideas to your superiors, because…

You need to have buy-in at every level of your organization. Social media tools are usually free, but your time and the time of your co-workers are not.

To get good content, you are going to need additional resources from many, if not all, of the departments in your company. Writing for these resources is outside of most people’s daily workload and you may need help to persuade them.

Plus, someone will need to own these tools, manage the calendar, and work with the corporate website owner.

Now commit, integrate, and support. Ever seen a blog that hasn’t been updated in two years or a Facebook page with no information? How about a company that never responds to comments on these pages? Yeah, it’s sad.

Social tool abandonment happens for many reasons. Maybe they didn’t have time to properly run it or they left their job and no one inherited the ownership. These types of things can make your brand look small and weak. It’s vital for multiple people to have access to the social media tools and to share ownership.

Integrate and support your posts with your traditional and digital marketing campaigns. If your communications work together with a consistent topic and message, then all of the tactics will produce better results.

 

Power to the people: How Kickstarter is becoming a business tool for entrepreneurs

One of my favorite Ted Talks episodes is a speech by Amanda Palmer, a musician well-known for giving her music away for free by asking her fans to help support her financially through crowdsourcing.  She asked for $100,000 via Kickstarter to fund the creation of her latest album. Her fans gave her $1.2 million.

From Amanda’s speech:

“I think people have been obsessed with the wrong question, which is, ‘How do we make people pay for music?’ What if we started asking, ‘How do we LET people pay for music?’” Continue reading

Wait, there's negativity on the Internet?

One of the most frequent questions I’m asked about social media is “what if someone posts something negative about us? Then other people might see the bad comment! Could we maybe just remove the comment?”  My answer: There can be negative comments whether or not you set up a company site, they just won’t happen on your turf. People will see the comments. However, most importantly, never remove negative social media comments. That mistake has been made many times, and it always goes viral:

-       Volkswagen

-       Susan G. Komen

-       ChapStick
Continue reading